Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Embed Slideshows in 7 Easy Steps on New Google Sites

I love the way our high school's modern world history course is designed. The first three to four units are about concept and skill development, while the remaining few units are application of what students learned in the first half of the course.

The application is done through case studies, which are often teacher driven. I couldn't see the value in application being so much about what the teacher is doing, so it was time for something different.


This semester, my modern world class is making a website for their case studies. The students are making each case study a page on the site with sub pages as necessary.

It made the most sense to me to make the case studies a website because it can serve as a place that brings it all together in a published space.
I've been inspired by Alan November to stop saying "turn it in" and start saying "publish it"? 
My students have made digital maps and infographics and photo essays in the past, but this time I wanted something different for them. I wanted my students to make something in a way that visualizes data from a Google Sheet.

I chose Awesome-Table because it has several useful sheets templates, and it helps that my students have 1:1 Chromebooks. Awesome-Table is also intuitive and easy to use with a little bit of spreadsheet basics and web editor experience.

The first case study was on China's Communist Revolution, so we started with a slideshow of the major events. This included an event title, image, and description with a link to the resource used.

He's what we did.

1. Choose the Template

Once you go to Awesome-Table.com and connect your Google account, the dashboard looks like the image below. It includes a few templates, access to the template gallery, and your recent projects listed at the bottom.

Choose the slideshow template. If it is not in the upper section of the dashboard, click the template gallery link in the upper right.



2. Set Up the Google Sheet

Since Awesome Table pulls data from a Google sheet, you can access the template sheet by clicking the link in the upper sidebar on the right.

The pencil icon allows you to change the Google Sheets doc to which you want to link to your Awesome Table project. This is particularly helpful if you already have a template in your drive that you want to link to the table project.


When you open the Google sheet (by clicking the link), you will see the sample data. Delete the sample data and add your own project data.  


3. Share a Folder

I've found that the best way to enter data into a spreadsheet is to let my students do it. Plus, they're the ones who need to learn this stuff, anyway. Why should I do it? Sure, it would be faster and neater, but that's not what our classroom looks like.
We make messes and learn from cleaning them up.
To provide access to the sheet and a place to gather images for the slideshow, share a folder link to a Drive folder. Make sure the permissions allow those with the link to have the ability to edit anything in the folder.

Then, share the link via a communication and content manager like Google Classroom to get your students working. We use Classroom, but we also use Team Drive for collaborative work.


4. Find an Image

The image selection step in this project exercises the learner's sense of contribution, which can translate into a stronger commitment to their learning experience.

This is also a good time to review some of the acceptable use issues related to images, such as licensing for publishing and permission to use for making money.

Once the image is saved to the student device and uploaded to the Drive folder, it's time to grab a link for the Google sheet. The link should have permissions set to "anyone with the link can view."


Paste the link into the appropriate column and row on the Google sheet. It may take some time for the image links to update the project. Always refresh your browser and the project for quicker results. Patience goes a long way, too. 


5. Write a Caption

The written portion of this project is completed in the description (slide text) column on the Google sheet. It's a great opportunity for students to practice one-sentence summaries as well as identifying the most significant takeaway for the audience.


6. Include a Link

The image description is clickable, so I had my students include the link from the source they used to write the description. The link goes in the far right column on the Google sheet.

7. Embed the Slideshow

The last step is to get the embed code to paste into the area of the website where the slideshow will live. Click the share icon and copy the last embed code format. Go to New Google Sites and double click the area where you want to place the slideshow. Choose the embed icon (<>) and select embed code to access the box in which the code needs to be pasted.



The finished product ...

When things don't work ...

We ran into one issue during this project. The links for the images only worked in a particular format. The format was available when we accessed the link from the horizontal tool bar. Select the image and choose the link icon to access the file link.

You may have to adjust the permissions to "anyone with the link can view" (share settings). Play around with it, and be open to troubleshooting with your students. Sometimes they know the answer.

Either way, it's good for students to see that problems are normal when it comes to content creation, and that these problems take time, patience, and testing solutions to resolve. 


Please share your thoughts below. I'd love to here from you. 

Thanks for reading!