Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Google Drive Preview Comments Transform Learning Activities

My students can now comment on images and PDFs in full view of their peers because of a recent Google Drive update. I know this sounds like a small thing, but it means not having to make a lot of materials on my end and places more of the decision-making on my students.


Let me explain how I used to design a cartoon analysis activity.

I chose a cartoon and added it to a Google Form. This form had questions and text boxes for student responses. We either discussed the results by looking at the response sheet projected on the screen or made comments on the sheet via Team Drive.

Although the activity design I described above is good and works, it's a lot of steps for me. It's better than paper, but not as good for students as how I do it now. Most importantly, I can spend my time providing feedback and answering questions instead of managing learning materials.

Check out my process for cartoon analysis with the new preview comments update.

1. Make a folder in Team Drive.

Team Drive is my favorite addition to G Suite since Google Classroom because it's an easy workspace to manage. We make folders for each unit and often students make docs or folders to facilitate a learning activity.


For more on Team Drive, check out this post that shares 10 ideas for your classroom.

2. Students find and upload the content.

The best part of this step in the activity is that the content is chosen by the students. At first, some of the images are not exactly what I'm looking for, so I spend extra time reinforcing image search expectations and file management – skills kids need to be fluent in digital spaces.

I took this opportunity to rename the cartoon image files with a number so I could assign those numbers to groups of three students.

 

3. Students use an analysis routine to make comments about specific parts of the content.

Thinking routines have replaced stock worksheets in our classroom. In this case, students focus on objects, people, and symbols before looking for text on the cartoon and trying to predict what message the artist wants to convey. (The second image below shows the explanation students see on our course website.)

The best part about the comment tool is the ability to select a specific area of an image. This takes away any question about what part of the cartoon a student is discussing.



4. Reply to comments to encourage participants to clarify or dig deeper. 

As students are working, so am I. After a walk around the room to ensure everyone understands the expectation, I watch and wait for the comments to which I can reply with questions for clarity or to dig deeper.



5. Debrief about the activity and some of the discussion highlights.

The comments and replies make the debrief on the activity much more efficient because the students can read a long in context as I discuss the analysis students have done.

Further, when you select a comment, the area the student selected to generate the comment stands out as the rest of the image darkens a bit. This simple feature adds so much focus for participation without having to take extra time to clarify which areas we are discussing.


Thanks for reading, and please share your thoughts on how to use this tool in the comments below.